Tag Archives: heart disease

7 Things Every Woman Should Know About Their Heart Health

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in American women. Diet, lifestyle choices and a few other key factors play a big role in a wide range of heart conditions. Take care of your heart by choosing the right foods to promote overall health.

Fruits and Vegetables Matter

When it comes to loading your plate, fruits and vegetables are where it’s at. Not only are they low in calories and high in dietary fiber and antioxidants, they also can help keep blood pressure in check. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart attack and stroke. What makes fruits and vegetables so good? They are packed with potassium, a mineral that has been shown to lower blood pressure in clinical studies.

For most adults, aiming for at least 2 cups of fruit and 3 cups of vegetables daily, is a good way to make sure you’re meeting your potassium goals. Plus, research has shown that fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a reduced risk for many chronic diseases, including heart disease..

Fat Matters for the Heart

The type of fat you eat also makes a difference. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, a healthy eating plan can contain up to 35 percent of total calories from fat. However, less than 10 percent should come from saturated fat.

A diet high in saturated fat may increase the risk for heart disease. Foods such as bacon, sausages, fatty meats, butter, ice cream and other full-fat dairy foods can be high in saturated fat.

Replacing sources of saturated fat with unsaturated fats has been shown to be beneficial in reducing “bad” cholesterol levels and may help lower the risk for heart disease. Foods such as olive oil, canola oil, avocados, nuts and seeds contain unsaturated fat.

Omega-3 fatty acids are a special type of unsaturated fat commonly found in fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, tuna and herring. They also are found in walnuts and flaxseed. Fish is a good source of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), whereas nuts and seeds contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Because these foods contain different types of omega-3 fatty acids, it is good to include a variety in the diet.

Slow and Steady Weight Loss for Heart Health

If your body mass index is considered to be overweight or obese, gradual weight loss offers the best results for overall health. Even a 5 to 10 percent loss in body weight can help reduce blood pressure and lead to other improvements in health. Regular physical activity also can be beneficial. Get at least 30 minutes of regular activity most days of the week. More moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity may be required for weight loss, so be sure to check with your physician before starting an exercise program.

Other Risk Factors

While you can change what you eat and whether you are physically active, there are some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change. These include:

  • Aging: The risk for heart disease increases with age.
  • Family History: Having a close blood relative, such as a parent or sibling, with heart disease increases your risk of having heart disease.
  • Race: Black women have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke than white women.
  • Previous Heart Attack: A history for past heart attacks increases the odds of having more in the future.

Source: Sarah Klemm, RD, CD, Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics


If you need a little extra help trying to live a heart healthy lifestyle, let Fresh ‘N Fit’s chef prepared meals make it easy for you. Adhering to the healthy eating guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association and the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics, our meals are made fresh every week using locally sourced ingredients.

Try it in February and get 10% off your first order when you use promo code  BLOGFEB0212 at checkout.

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Heart Health Month: Identifying The Risk Factors Of Heart Disease

By: Julia Lott, MS, RD, LD Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine
February is heart health month so over the next few weeks we’ll be giving you helpful suggestions and information on how to live a heart healthy lifestyle. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in the United States. There are numerous conditions that can increase your risk of heart disease. Many of these conditions are controllable and can greatly reduce the possibility of heart disease.

Diabetes

Uncontrolled diabetes can cause a build up of sugar in the blood. Also, with a buildup of glucose in the body, blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels can be damaged. People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than those without diabetes. 

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure or hypertension is a major risk factor for heart disease.  It occurs when the pressure in the blood vessels and arteries is too high.  When high blood pressure is not controlled, it not only affects the heart, but it can also damage other major organs of the body, such as the kidneys and brain. 

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol can build up on the walls of the arteries and those of the heart.  As a result, plaque build up and atherosclerosis can occur.  This causes decrease blood flow to the heart and other parts of the body.

Physical Inactivity

Not getting enough exercise or physical activity can lead to heart disease.  Physical activity reduces stress, lowers blood pressure, and reduces likelihood of developing chronic diseases.  Try to exercise at least 30 minutes every day.

Many forms of heart disease are preventable with healthy lifestyle choices.  In addition to receiving various benefits from regular physical activity, eating the right foods can help prevent heart disease. 

Choosing foods that are low in sodium, fat and cholesterol can put you on the right track. If you’re not sure about what foods to eat or don’t have to time to prepare your own healthy meals, Fresh n’ Fit Cuisine can help.  There are over 300 meals to choose from on 7 different menus, so you will never get bored of eating healthy.

Get $20 off your first order when you use promo code FEBBLOG20 at checkout.


Shake The Habit: How To Lower Your Sodium Intake

By: Julia Lott, MS, RD, LD Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine
The average person eats more than 3,400 mg of sodium a day. However, the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends having 2,300 mg a day.  According to the American Heart Association, 70% of the sodium Americans eat comes from packaged, prepared and restaurant foods, not from table salt.  Excess sodium intake could lead to serious medication condition such as heart disease, stroke and high blood pressure. Here are a few simple ways to low your sodium intake:

Read the Label

Packaged foods can be loaded with sodium; even foods that you would least expect to have it. Surprisingly, breakfast cereal can be loaded with sodium.  Also, look for “no salt added” labels. This means that no salt was added during processing.

Spice It Up

Who says low sodium food has to taste bland? Instead of using salt when you prepare meals, try experimenting with herbs and spices to flavor your food.  Who knows you may discover a spice that you’ve never tried before and like it.  There’s a plethora of herbs a spices to choose. A few of my favorites include:  coriander, nutmeg, parsley, cumin, cilantro, ginger, rosemary, marjoram, thyme, bay leaf, oregano, dry mustard and dill.

Snack Foods

Snack foods like pretzels, crackers, and chips can have several hundred milligrams of sodium per serving. When choosing a low sodium snack, try fresh fruit, unsalted trail mix, Greek yogurt or raw veggies. 

No Salt Please

Typically restaurant food is outrageously high in sodium. Before going out to eat, check out the menu and nutrition info online. This way you’ll have an idea of some good choices before you sit down. Also, you can request for no salt to be added to your food and sauces on the side. Even following a few simple tips on sodium, can make a big difference when it comes to developing serious conditions likes heart disease and hypertension.  Becoming knowledgeable about where the sodium is coming from and how to reduce it will greatly impact overall health.


Maintaining a healthy weight, being active, watching your sugar and sodium levels are all things that we would like to do more in 2019. Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine’s chef prepared meals adhere to the healthy eating guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association and the Academy of Nutrition& Dietetics.

Our 7 menus that include Low CarbPaleoKetoGluten Free and more. If you place your order before our 9am, Friday cutoff time, you’ll get 10% off your first order when you use promo code LOWSUGAR10 at checkout.

Heart Health for Women

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Heart disease is the leading cause of death in American women. Diet, lifestyle choices and a few other key factors play a big role in a wide range of heart conditions. Take care of your heart by choosing the right foods to promote overall health.

Fruits and Vegetables Matter

When it comes to loading your plate, fruits and vegetables are where it’s at. Not only are they low in calories and high in dietary fiber and antioxidants, they also can help keep blood pressure in check. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart attack and stroke. What makes fruits and vegetables so good? They are packed with potassium, a mineral that has been shown to lower blood pressure in clinical studies.

For most adults, aiming for at least 2 cups of fruit and 3 cups of vegetables daily, is a good way to make sure you’re meeting your potassium goals. Plus, research has shown that fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a reduced risk for many chronic diseases, including heart disease..

Fat Matters for the Heart

The type of fat you eat also makes a difference. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, a healthy eating plan can contain up to 35 percent of total calories from fat. However, less than 10 percent should come from saturated fat.

A diet high in saturated fat may increase the risk for heart disease. Foods such as bacon, sausages, fatty meats, butter, ice cream and other full-fat dairy foods can be high in saturated fat.

Replacing sources of saturated fat with unsaturated fats has been shown to be beneficial in reducing “bad” cholesterol levels and may help lower the risk for heart disease. Foods such as olive oil, canola oil, avocados, nuts and seeds contain unsaturated fat.

Omega-3 fatty acids are a special type of unsaturated fat commonly found in fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, tuna and herring. They also are found in walnuts and flaxseed. Fish is a good source of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), whereas nuts and seeds contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Because these foods contain different types of omega-3 fatty acids, it is good to include a variety in the diet.

Slow and Steady Weight Loss for Heart Health

If your body mass index is considered to be overweight or obese, gradual weight loss offers the best results for overall health. Even a 5 to 10 percent loss in body weight can help reduce blood pressure and lead to other improvements in health. Regular physical activity also can be beneficial. Get at least 30 minutes of regular activity most days of the week. More moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity may be required for weight loss, so be sure to check with your physician before starting an exercise program.

Other Risk Factors

While you can change what you eat and whether you are physically active, there are some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change. These include:

  • Aging: The risk for heart disease increases with age.
  • Family History: Having a close blood relative, such as a parent or sibling, with heart disease increases your risk of having heart disease.
  • Race: Black women have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke than white women.
  • Previous Heart Attack: A history for past heart attacks increases the odds of having more in the future.

Source: Sarah Klemm, RD, Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics


Need help with preparing meals for a heart healthy diet? Let the chefs at Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine do the work for you. Our macro-based menus adhere to the healthy eating guidelines of the American Diabetic Association, the American Heart Association as well as the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics.

Give us a try and get $20 off your first order with promo code HEALTHYHEART20 at checkout.

Heart Health And Diet

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Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America. About 92 million people in the United States have some form of heart/cardiovascular disease — that’s about 29 percent of the population. Many of these deaths and risk factors are preventable, and food choices have a big impact on your heart’s health, even if you have other risk factors.

Only a few risk factors, such as age, gender and family history, cannot be controlled. You can prevent and control many risk factors of heart disease, such as high blood cholesterol and high blood pressure with lifestyle changes and medications.

Lifestyle Changes

A healthy lifestyle — following a healthy eating plan, maintaining a healthy weight, regular physical activity, quitting smoking and managing stress — can lower your risk for heart disease and may prevent current heart disease from worsening.

A Heart-Healthy Diet

To lower your risk of heart disease, follow these recommendations directly from the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans:

  1. “Follow a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan.”
  2. “Focus on variety, nutrient density, and amount.”
  3. “Limit calories from added sugars and saturated fats and reduce sodium intake.”
  4. “Shift to healthier food and beverage choices.”
  5. “Support healthy eating patterns for all.”

If you are at high risk for heart disease or already have heart disease, your first step should be to meet with a registered dietitian nutritionist. Together with your health-care provider, your RDN can help you lower your risk or improve your existing condition by developing a personalized eating and lifestyle plan.

Source: Taylor Wolfram, Academy of Dietetics & Nutrition


Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine’s Healthy Mix and Vegetarian meals adhere to the healthy eating guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society and the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics.

And now that we offer free nutrition coaching and support, Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine makes it easier for you to eat healthy in the new year.

Use promo code JANBLOG10 to save 10% off your first order at checkout.

21 Rewards That You Will Get From Exercise

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Do yourself a favor and print this list and post it where you’ll see it every day. When you need motivation or encouragement, simply read over this list and take action. Remember that action alleviates anxiety. So whenever you’re feeling anxious over the current shape of your body, take that as a reminder to jump into action. And then begin to reap these 21 rewards of exercise:

1. You’ll reset your body

Exercise has been described as a giant reset button. A good workout will block appetite swings, improve your mood and even help you sleep.

2. Your clothes will fit better

Consistent exercise will tone and tighten your body, causing your clothes to not only fit better but to also look nicer. Also exercise ensures that soon you’ll be trading your clothes in for smaller sizes.

3. You’ll be less stressed

You have enough stress in your life—it’s time for a break. A good workout invigorates your muscles, leaving you relaxed and less stressed.

4. You’ll have more energy

WebMD tallied research studies and concluded that 90% of them prove exercise increases energy levels in sedentary patients. Next time you feel fatigued, fight it will the most powerful tool available: exercise.

5. You’ll be stronger

Exercise improves muscle strength and endurance, two things that you use throughout each day. When you exercise consistently you’ll be pleasantly surprised when difficult tasks begin to seem easy.

6. You’ll be less likely to binge

Exercise has a powerful anti-binge effect on the body. This is due in part by an increase in sensitivity to leptin, a protein hormone, which has an appetite-taming effect.

7. You’ll burn calories

You know that excess body fat is made up of stored and unused calories. Fight back by burning loads of calories with fat-blasting workouts.

8. You’ll be more confident

Who doesn’t wish they walked and talked with more confidence? A consistent exercise program will do just that. As your body becomes more fit, watch as your confidence sky-rockets.

9. You’ll have fun

Believe it or not, exercise can be extremely enjoyable. Remember how fun it was to run around as a child? Tap into your inner child as you find a mode of exercise that gets you excited.

10. You’ll reduce your blood pressure

Exercise has been proven more effective than medication in reducing blood pressure to normal levels. A single workout has been shown to reduce blood pressure for the day and regular exercise reduces overall blood pressure in the long run.

11. You’ll lose the jiggles

Regular exercise tightens flabby arms, legs and waistlines. So wave goodbye to the jiggles with a solid exercise program.

12. You’ll increase insulin sensitivity

Researchers at Laval University in Quebec discovered that exercise improved insulin sensitivity dramatically. Peak after-meal insulin levels dropped by more than 20 percent after as little as 3 weeks of consistent exercise.

13. You’ll sleep better

Do you toss and turn for hours before falling asleep? Exercise is a powerful sleep aid. Your tired muscles encourage your body to quickly fall asleep so they can get their overnight repair work done.

14. You’ll lower your risk of heart disease

Regular exercise strengthens your heart and makes it more resilient against disease. A sedentary lifestyle is a major risk factor for heart disease, so rest assured that consistent exercise is your ally against disease.

15. You’ll feel great

Vigorous exercise releases natural endorphins (happy hormones) into your blood stream that dissolve pain and anxiety. You’ve probably heard of ‘runner’s high’, this can be achieved by any great workout.

16. You’ll lower your risk of diabetes

Studies show that exercising as little as half an hour each day can dramatically reduce your risk of diabetes. If you are at risk of diabetes, or already have diabetes, regular exercise is the most effective treatment for reversing the disease.

17. You’ll meet cool people

You could benefit from a group of new, energetic friends, right? Gyms, bootcamps, workout centers and even the jogging trail are all great places to connect with fun new friends.

18. You’ll improve your BMI

You know that maintaining a healthy BMI is key in disease prevention. Exercise is the best way to keep your BMI under control.

19. You’ll increase your endurance

Do you ever get out of breath when walking up stairs or through the mall? Regular exercise builds your endurance for everyday activities.

20. Your doctor will be impressed

How many times has your doctor given you the lecture about losing weight and exercising more? Exercise regularly and get your MD off your back!

21. You’ll look amazing

Are you happy with the shape and size of your body? Regular exercise works wonders on your physique. Within a few weeks you’ll see shape and tone in all the right places.

By: Rene Serrate, Alpharetta Fit Body Boot Camp


The calorie and portion controlled meals at Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine are the perfect complement to any fitness routine. Every one of our 300+ meals have been approved by our Registered Dietitian and chefs by our professional culinary team.

Start the new year off right and get $20 off your first order when you use promo code WPDEC20 at checkout.

Healthy ways to celebrate Valentine’s Day

photo-3In celebration of February’s American Heart Month, enjoy Valentine’s Day with your loved one with heart-healthy foods that say, “I love you.” The heart symbol that represents this holiday can serve as a reminder of how important it is to keep ourselves and our families protected against the No. 1 killer in America: heart disease.

The purpose of American Heart Month is to promote awareness about heart disease and stroke. Now that January is behind us, some of the motivation to recommit to a healthy lifestyle in the New Year may be dwindling.

Here are easy ways to use Valentine’s Day as a catalyst to reinvigorate your plan for balanced eating and activity with heart health in mind.

Dinner at Home

This year, choose to steer away from the overpriced restaurant fixed course Valentine’s Day menus and prepare a delicious meal at home. One of the benefits of cooking at home is you can control both the ingredients and the portion sizes, keeping calories and sodium in check.

Use unique and fun ingredients to make the meal special. Try out a new recipe to impress your partner and elevate the meal above a typical weeknight dinner. Be sure to include a lean protein and lots of veggies.

Not only is the color red symbolic of love, but when it comes to food, it also represents a host of beneficial nutritional properties. For example, red bell peppers, red onions, tomatoes, radicchio and strawberries, in addition to other fruits and vegetables, contain powerful antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and fiber that help protect the cardiovascular system and keeps cells healthy.

Related: No Time To Cook? Highlights from Our Winter Menu

Minimize Salt

Although most of us take in about 3,400 mg of sodium daily, the recommended safe limit is 2,300 mg. People with certain health problems, like high blood pressure, should limit sodium further to 1,500 mg daily. Eating freshly prepared homemade meals and limiting processed foods and salty snacks can help reduce salt intake. To cut salt, but not taste, use flavorful ingredients like lemon, garlic, herbs, spices, pepper, mustard and onion as a substitute.

Creative Gifts

Flowers and chocolate might be traditional Valentine’s Day gifts, and while they are a nice gesture, there are other sweet ways to show you care. A gift that involves doing something engaging together like taking a cooking class or pottery class can be both unexpected and allow for intimate quality time together, creating lasting memories. A piece of art or a framed black and white photograph makes for a sentimental, non-edible gift for those trying to avoid sweets. If chocolate is a must for this special day, opt for dark chocolate with a higher percentage of cocoa for the natural antioxidants and flavonoids found in the cocoa bean. Choose products that contain fewer added sugars and fats and have not undergone Dutch processing, which decreases the healthy properties of the cocoa.

Physical Activity

Staying active is an important part of a healthy lifestyle and disease prevention. Including loved ones in your exercise routine can make it that much more enjoyable. Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderately intense physical activity weekly.

For example, make a date to walk together for about 30 minutes before heading out for the day or in the evening after dinner. Healthy habits that you make a part of your lifestyle are more likely to stick and give you long-lasting results.

Even if you don’t celebrate Valentine’s Day or are happily single, these strategies can be shared with friends, family and colleagues to promote heart health and reduce risk of heart attack and stroke.

Source: San Gabriel Valley Tribune


At Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine, our portion and calorie controlled meals go hand in hand with an active lifestyle. Whether you’re looking for meatless alternatives with our Vegetarian menu, or gluten and dairy free meals from our Paleo menu, we have something for everyone with over 300 meals to choose from.

Try us this Valentine’s Day and save $20 off your first order with promo code VALENTINE20!

 

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