Category Archives: Vegetarian

New Meals For The Week of August 21

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With over 350 meals on 5 different menus, here’s the new meals that we added for next week.

New Meals For The Week of August 21, 2017

Healthy Mix:
Breakfast – Chicken Philly Omelet Served with Greek Yogurt with Fruit on the Bottom
Lunch – Kale Chicken Ranch Wrap Served with a Broccoli & Quinoa Salad
Dinner – Tequila Lime Chicken with Cilantro Rice,Stewed Black Beans & Pico De Gallo
Lunch – Roasted Chicken Made with Springer Mountain Farms Chicken Served with Zucchini Noodle Pasta Salad Made with Artichokes, Cucumber, Black Olives, Peppercini, Onions, Green Beans, Spinach, and Feta Cheese Tossed in Greek Dressing
Dinner – Chicken Alfredo With Roasted Spaghetti Squash, Green Peas & Carrots.
Lunch – Buffalo Chickpea Salad with Pita with English Pea, Corn & Red Pepper Succotash on the side

Use promo code AUGBLOG20 at checkout to take $20 off your next order of $50 or more! Visit FreshNFitCuisine.com today and choose from our 5 chef prepared menushealthy snack packslow cal dessertshouse made protein bars and Fresh Extras.

5 Myths about Building a Healthy Vegetarian Meal

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Vegetarian meals are gaining in popularity — even among regular meat-eaters. According to a 2016 poll by the Vegetarian Resource Group, 37 percent of Americans eat at least one vegetarian meal per week.

As more and more individuals reduce their meat intake, one essential question remains: Are vegetarian and vegan diets healthy? The answer is yes. If appropriately planned, vegetarian or vegan diets can be healthful, nutritionally adequate and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases.

But many myths still surround the health implications of a vegetarian diet. Learn the facts when it comes to plant-based diets.

Myth #1: Vegetarians and Vegans Have a Hard Time Getting Enough Protein

As meat has become synonymous with protein, many consumers struggle to identify non-meat sources of this dietary building block. But adequate protein needs easily are attained through a well-planned diet. And plant-based protein typically contains more fiber and less saturated fat, factors that are cornerstones of a heart-healthy diet. There are many versatile plant-based sources of protein that fit into a healthy eating plan: legumes (beans, lentils, peas and peanuts), soy products, whole grains, nuts, seeds and (for lacto-ovo vegetarians) low-fat or fat-free dairy and eggs.

Vegans should consume more protein than their meat- and dairy-eating counterparts. That’s because protein from whole grains and legumes has lower digestibility than animal protein. Protein from plant foods is encased in plant cell walls, which are hard to penetrate and digest. For familiar, high-protein vegan options, try bean burritos, tofu and vegetable stir-fries, or lentil chili.

Myth #2: To Build Strong Bones, You Must Include Dairy in Your Diet

Dairy is not the only food that can help build and protect strong bones. A number of nutrients are needed for bone health, including calcium, vitamin D and protein. Each of these nutrients can be found in plant foods such as kale, broccoli, bok choy, calcium-set tofu and fortified soymilk. Some vegetables such as spinach and rhubarb are good sources of calcium, but they also are high in oxalates, which decrease calcium absorption, so include a wide variety of other leafy green vegetables more often.

If you are forgoing dairy, ensure that you get the recommended dietary allowance of calcium by spreading your green vegetable intake throughout the day and choosing calcium-fortified foods such as non-dairy milk, ready-to-eat cereals, orange juice and tofu. In addition to following a nutrient-rich diet, weight-bearing exercise such as yoga, running, brisk walking and strength training is an essential component for increasing bone strength.

Myth #3: Eating Soy Increases Risk of Breast Cancer

For vegans and vegetarians, incorporating soy in the diet is an easy way to meet both protein and calcium requirements. Despite news reports to the contrary, there is no proven soy-cancer link. There is evidence that girls who consume soy in childhood and adolescence have a lower lifetime risk for breast cancer; soy in adulthood doesn’t appear to have that effect. No matter your diet preference, variety is key. Swapping animal-based protein for soy is a good way to add variety to your meals. Aim for less processed sources such as tempeh, edamame and tofu.

Myth #4: Vegetarian Diets Are Not Appropriate for Pregnant Women, Children or Athletes

A well-planned vegetarian or vegan diet can meet the nutrient needs of people from all stages of life, including pregnant and lactating women, children and athletes. It’s just about making sure you get the nutrients you need. Pregnant women, for example, need more iron; expectant mothers should eat plenty of iron-rich foods and include a source of vitamin C to help increase absorption (iron is not absorbed well from plant-based sources). Try these iron and vitamin C combinations: beans and salsa, broccoli and tofu, black-eyed peas and collard greens.

For infants, children and adolescents, a vegetarian diet can promote normal growth. As with adults, vegan children may have slightly higher protein needs because of how the body digests plant protein. However, these needs typically can be fulfilled if the diet provides enough calories and diversity of foods.

And while most competitive athletes require increased energy, protein and nutrient needs for optimal performance, there’s no reason they can’t get everything they need nutritionally from plant sources. All it takes is a little diligence in menu planning.

Myth #5: Just Because Something Is Vegetarian Means It Is Healthy

The “vegetarian” or “vegan” label doesn’t automatically equal good health. While some cookies, chips and sweetened cereal might be vegetarian foods, they also are likely high in added sugars and oils. Meatless eaters might find it easy to load up on processed foods such as veggie burgers, but lesser processed options should make up the bulk of a vegetarian diet. And cheese, while a good source of calcium, also contains saturated fat and sodium. So what is the best way to ensure a food is a good choice? Read the label. Look for low levels of saturated fat, added sugars and sodium. These key nutrition label components are much better indicators of a food’s health than whether or not it is vegetarian. Being a healthy vegetarian eater means loading up on veggies, fruits, whole grains and lean proteins.

Source: Alexandra Caspero, RD, Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics


At Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine, our Vegetarian menu is just one of the 5 menus that our chefs prepare each week. Like our Healthy Mix menu, our Vegetarian meals adhere to the healthy eating guideline of the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association and the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics.

Give it a try today and get 10% off your first order of $50 or more when you use promo code JLYBLOG10 at checkout.

Hit Your PR With Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine

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After a couple weeks of experimenting with Fresh ‘N Fit dinners, I dove in head first and decided to entrust all of my meals, seven days a week, to Fresh ‘N Fit. Being that breakfast is my favorite meal of the day, I was eager to see if Fresh ‘N Fit breakfasts would be as good as their dinners, and I was not disappointed. These last two weeks, I have enjoyed delicious omelettes, parfaits, pancakes, and even crepes – something I would never have made for myself.

It is no coincidence that during my two weeks of having all of my meals prepared by Fresh ‘N Fit, I hit a rep PR on bench press and snatch.

My training has been going exceptionally well these past couple weeks, undoubtedly due in part to the nutrition I am receiving through Fresh ‘N Fit. Without proper nutrition, I am simply not able to perform at my best. My next powerlifting meet is coming up in a couple months, and I am thrilled that this meet prep will be made infinitely easier with the help of Fresh ‘N Fit. I anticipate not only being able to make weight, but also to hit some PRs on meet day!

About the author: Tina Nosari is a certified CrossFit Level I trainer, a USA Powerlifting Club Coach and a diehard metalhead. Make sure to follow her on Instagram.


At Fresh ‘n Fit Cuisine, we want you to let our chef prepared meals fuel your busy life! No matter what your dietary preferences are, our 5 menus have something for everyone. So whether you want Vegetarian, Paleo, Low Carb or even 30 day cleanse approved meals…we’ve got you covered. We even have healthy snacks and house made protein bars.

Want to give us a try? Use promo code MAYBLG20 at checkout and get $20 off your first order of $50 or more.

Say Goodbye To Meal Prep Sundays

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I was recently introduced to Fresh ‘n Fit through a friend. He knows how important health and fitness are to me, so he suggested that I try it out. For my first two weeks, I decided to do the five-day plan, dinners only, to see if I liked it. I was instantly hooked, and almost immediately decided to upgrade my plan to three meals a day, seven days a week. Essentially all of my meals will be coming from Fresh ‘n Fit now. There is simply no substitute for the convenience and the quality of this meal plan all for a reasonable price.

Meal prep is usually a complicated task for me. I am a vegetarian, I track my macros very strictly, and I practice cutting and bulking cycles to complement my training. I generally spend all day Sunday planning my meals for the week, going grocery shopping, and cooking. If I have anything else planned on a given Sunday, it’s almost impossible for me to get all of this done. When I don’t get my meal prep done, my week is a nutritional disaster. Enter Fresh N’ Fit. They do all my shopping, planning, and cooking for me, they are vegetarian-friendly, and they even calculate my macros. These last two Sundays, I have had time to train, go hiking, clean the house, go to the dog park, and even sit on my front porch and relax for a while. I don’t remember the last time I was able to do so much on a Sunday. Needless to say, I am so grateful that my friend helped me to join the Fresh ‘N Fit team. I can’t wait to take my training to the next level with the help of proper nutrition from Fresh ‘N Fit!

About the author: Tina Nosari is a certified CrossFit Level I trainer, a USA Powerlifting Club Coach and a diehard metalhead. Make sure to follow her on Instagram.


At Fresh ‘n Fit Cuisine, we want you to say goodbye to “Meal Prep Sundays.” Let our chef prepared meals allow you to spend time doing what you enjoy! No matter what your dietary preferences are, our 5 menus have something for everyone. So whether you want Vegetarian, Paleo, Low Carb or even 30 day cleanse approved meals…we’ve got you covered. We even have healthy snacks and house made protein bars.

Give us a try today and get back your weekends. Use promo code MAYBLG10 to get 10% off your first order of $50 or more.

25 Heart-Healthy Cooking Tips for American Heart Month

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To lower your risk of heart disease or to manage your existing disease, try these tips for preparing meals.

Limit Saturated and Trans Fat

  • Select lean cuts of beef and pork, especially cuts with “loin” or “round” in their name.
  • Cut back on processed meats high in saturated fat, such as hot dogs, salami and bacon.
  • Bake, broil, roast, stew or stir-fry lean meats, fish or poultry.
  • Drain the fat off of cooked, ground meat.
  • When you make a stew or soup, refrigerate leftovers and skim off the fat with a spoon before reheating and serving.
  • Eat fish regularly. Try different ways of cooking such as baking, broiling, grilling and poaching to add variety.
  • Include plant foods as sources of protein, including soybeans, pinto beans, lentils and nuts.
  • Replace higher-fat cheeses with lower-fat options such as reduced-fat feta and part-skim mozzarella.
  • Thicken sauces with evaporated fat-free milk instead of whole milk.
  • Move toward using lower-fat milk and yogurt. Start with 2-percent products, then move to 1-percent and finally to fat-free to adjust to the new taste.
  • Use liquid vegetable oils and soft margarine instead of stick margarine or shortening.
  • Limit trans fats often found in foods such as cakes, cookies, crackers, pastries, pies, muffins, doughnuts and French fries. Many food manufacturers have removed trans fats from their foods. Check the Nutrition Facts Label on food packaging to see if trans fats are listed.
  • Use small amounts of oils such as canola and olive in recipes and for sautéing.
  • Make salad dressings with olive or pecan oil.

Eat Foods Containing Omega-3 Fatty Acids

  • Select oils that provide omega-3 fatty acids, such as canola or flaxseed oil.
  • Add walnuts to cereal, salads or muffins. Try walnut oil in salad dressings, too.
  • Eat two 4-ounce portions of fatty fish each week, such as salmon, lake trout, albacore tuna (in water, if canned), mackerel and sardines.
  • Some chickens are given feed that is high in omega-3s so their eggs will contain more as well. When buying eggs, check the package label.

Reduce Salt (Sodium)

  • Prepare foods at home so you can control the amount of salt in your meals.
  • Use as little salt in cooking as possible. You can cut at least half the salt from most recipes.
  • Add no additional salt to food at the table.
  • Select reduced-sodium or no-salt-added canned soups and vegetables.
  • Check the Nutrition Facts Label for sodium and choose products with lower sodium content.
  • Season foods with herbs, spices, garlic, onions, peppers and lemon or lime juice to add flavor.

Source: Taylor Wolfram, MS, RDN for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics


At Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine, our Healthy Mix and Vegetarian menus adhere to the healthy eating guidelines of the American Heart Association and the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics. Try our 5 gourmet menus that also include paleo, low carb, gluten free today and get $20 off your first order with promo code BGFEB20 at checkout.

What do 2 of Atlanta’s Most Popular Radio Personalities Have In Common?

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Anyone who has experienced the joys of Atlanta’s morning commute has most likely listened to either of radio’s most popular morning shows…Q100’s The Bert Show and 94.9 The Bull’s Caffeinated Radio with Jason and Kristen. Because of their different musical formats, one might think that the 2 shows wouldn’t have that much in common with each other. While that might be true to some extent, the biggest similarity is Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine’s meals.
Why are The Bert Show’s Cassie Young and Caffeinated’s Kristen Gates eating our meals? Because they work! Cassie and Kristen are always on the go, so finding time to eat nutritionally balanced meals, much less prepare them, has always been a big problem for them. That’s where Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine comes in!
Both Cassie and Kristen have been enjoying our Custom Meal Plan option, which allows them to choose their favorites from each of our 5 menus. Our chef-prepared meals are a perfect fit for their busy lifestyle and can be for yours too! So whether you need a meal planhealthy snack packs, or low calorie desserts, stop wasting time grocery shopping, cooking and cleaning and let our chefs take care of all of the work.

Try our 5 gourmet menus that include paleo, low carb, gluten free, vegetarian and healthy mix, today and get $20 off your first order with promo code JAN20BLOG at checkout.

Cassie’s Custom Menu For The Week of January 30th

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As an important part of Q100’s The Bert Show, Cassie Young is always on the go. Our meals are a perfect fit for Cassie’s busy lifestyle and can be for yours too! So whether you need a meal plan, healthy snack packs, or low calorie desserts, stop wasting time grocery shopping, cooking and cleaning and let our chefs take care of all of the work.
To order Cassie’s Custom Menu or build your own from over 300 meals, make sure you place your order by 4PM on Thursday, January 26th.

#CassiesCustomMenu for the week of January 30, 2017

Monday – Wednesday
Breakfast
  • Nutella Crepes (Vegetarian) Calories: 422; Protein: 15g; Carb: 36g;  Fat: 20g
  • Twice Baked Sweet Potato (Paleo) Calories: 404; Protein: 21g; Carb: 40g; Fat: 15g
  • Raspberry Date Chia Pudding (Paleo) Calories: 452; Protein: 41g; Carb: 37g; Fat: 14g
Lunch
  • Vegetable Gumbo (Vegetarian) Calories: 381; Protein: 21g; Carb: 60g; Fat: 6g
  • Turkey Crossant (Healthy Mix) Calories: 390; Protein: 18g; Carb: 42g; Fat: 15g
  • Blue Crab Cakes (Low Carb) Calories: 384; Protein: 27g; Carb: 20g; Fat: 22g
Dinner
  • Curried Turkey Stew (Low Carb) Calories: 415; Protein: 35g; Carb: 24g; Fat: 21g
  • Stuffed Butternut Squash (Vegetarian) Calories: 389; Protein: 14g; Carb: 56g; Fat: 14g
  • Veggie Pot Pie (Vegetarian) Calories: 386; Protein: 10g; Carb: 57g; Fat: 14g
Thursday – Friday
Breakfast
  • Egg White Benedict (Vegetarian) Calories: 384; Protein: 25g; Carb: 47g; Fat: 9g
  • Peanut Butter Flax Granola Bar (Low Carb) Calories: 380; Protein: 20g; Carb: 30g Fat: 15g
Lunch
  • Beet Risotto (Vegetarian) Calories: 408; Protein: 19g; Carb: 61g; Fat: 8g
  • Jambalaya Bake (Healthy Mix) Calories: 383; Protein: 22g; Carb: 57g; Fat: 6g
Dinner
  • Stuffed Poblano Pepper (Vegetarian) Calories: 418; Protein: 16g; Carb: 59g; Fat: 15g
  • Turkey Pot Pie (Healthy Mix) Calories: 417; Protein: 27g; Carb: 28g; Fat: 22g

Pick your start date today and get 10% off your first order when you use promo code CASSIE10BL at checkout.

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