Category Archives: Diabetes

HEALTHY SNACKING WITH DIABETES

cracker-grapes-400x400When managing your diabetes with diet and exercise, it can be difficult to know which snacks won’t spike your blood pressure or give you adverse snacking side effects. Snacking can contribute to a healthy diet, ensuring that your body gets the fuel it needs every 3–5 hours to control your blood sugar and appetite, and keep you energized.

A snack, as opposed to a treat, is a “mini-meal” meant to provide nutrients required by the body. Snacks that contain a combination of carbohydrates with fiber and protein, while low in fat, salt, and sugar, are better at controlling blood sugar and appetite. Try these ideas for healthy snacks.

Average 15 grams (g) total carbohydrate*

  • One whole Thomas® Light Multi-Grain English Muffin with 1 tablespoon (Tbsp) nut butter
  • 2 Tbsp raisins and ¼ cup (C) almonds
  • Hard-cooked egg and one slice of whole-wheat toast with ½ teaspoon (tsp) margarine
  • One half banana or one medium apple with 1 Tbsp peanut butter
  • ½ C low-fat cottage cheese and ½ C lite peaches
  • 4 ounce (oz) Kozy Shack® No Sugar Added Rice Pudding and ¼ C nuts
  • Kabobs made with 1 C melon and 1 oz low-fat cheese
  • Celery and dip made from 1 Tbsp peanut butter and 2 Tbsp raisins
  • ½ C sugar snap peas and 2 Tbsp hummus (bean dip)
  • Five Reduced Fat Triscuits® with 1 oz low-fat cheese
  • ½ C lite tuna or egg salad in one half of a whole-wheat pita
  • One whole Thomas Light Multi-Grain English Muffin topped with tomato sauce and 1 oz low-fat mozzarella cheese, and then baked
  • 10 Multi-Grain Wheat Thins® with 1 oz low-fat string cheese and 4 fluid ounces (fl oz) of tomato juice
  • One small baked potato topped with salsa and 1 oz low-fat cheese
  • 1 oz lean ham rolled in one whole-grain pancake

Average 30 g total carbohydrate*

  • Trail mix (example: 1 C Kashi® Heart to Heart® Cereal, 2 Tbsp dried cranberries, ¼ C almonds)
  • Whole-wheat tortilla filled with ½ C low-fat refried beans, 1 oz low-fat cheddar cheese, and salsa, and heated in microwave
  • One half banana and 1 Tbsp peanut butter placed and rolled in whole-wheat tortilla
  • ½ C whole-grain cereal with ½ C skim milk
  • 1 C sugar-free, fat-free yogurt, topped with ¼ C Fiber One® or Grape-Nuts
  • One Eggo® Nutri-Grain® Waffle, dipped  in ½ C Mott’s® Healthy Harvest Sauce (applesauce)
  • ½ C fruit blended with 1 C low-fat, sugar-free yogurt and 2 Tbsp flaxseed meal
  • Nachos made with eight Baked Snyder’s® of Hanover MultiGrain Tortilla Chips, 1 oz cheese, and salsa
  • ½ C Pepperidge Farm® Goldfish® Baked Snack Crackers Made With Whole Grain and a medium apple
  • Whole-wheat tortilla, topped with ½ C apples and low-fat cheddar, and then heated in microwave
  • 9 oz angel food cake or reduced-fat biscuit with 1 C strawberries
  • One small baked sweet potato, topped with ½ C pineapple tidbits
  • One small baked potato, topped with ½ C bean chili
  • 3 C low-fat popcorn with 2 Tbsp nuts and 1 C sugar-free hot cocoa

Remember that Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine’s healthy mix and low carb menus are great for managing diabetes. With a low glycemic index, low sodium, and low sugar levels, our meals provide balanced nutrition, convenient eating, and delicious flavors. Try it today and receive 10% OFF your first order with promo code BLOG 10!

Fitness Partner Spotlight: Medical Fitness & Wellness Group, part 2

Medical Fitness & Wellness Group is a medical fitness facility located in Johns Creek. In addition to being one of our referral partners, they provide medical and corrective solutions for those diagnosed with chronic conditions. In part 2 of our Fitness Partner Spotlight series, we met with founder Mike Hardy to find out the importance of a proper diet.

Watch the rest of our Fitness Partner Spotlight series on our YouTube page.


No matter what your condition is, a properly balanced diet is key. At Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine, we offer a wide variety of meals ranging from paleo to gluten free to vegetarian. Try one of our gourmet, chef prepared menus now and save 10% off your first order with promo code BLOG10.

Fitness Partner Spotlight: Medical Fitness & Wellness Group, part I

Medical Fitness & Wellness Group is a medical fitness facility located in Johns Creek. In addition to being one of our referral partners, they provide medical and corrective solutions for those diagnosed with chronic conditions. In part 1 of our Fitness Partner Spotlight series, we met with founder Mike Hardy to find out a little bit more about their studio.

Watch the rest of our Fitness Partner Spotlight series on our YouTube page.


No matter what your condition is, a properly balanced diet is key. At Fresh ‘N Fit Cuisine, we offer a wide variety of meals ranging from paleo to gluten free to vegetarian. Try one of our gourmet, chef prepared menus now and save 10% off your first order with promo code BLOG10.

Carbohydrates — Part of a Healthful Diabetes Diet

Caribbean Coconut Chicken

Caribbean Coconut Chicken

A common nutrition myth is that individuals with diabetes need to avoid carbohydrates. While individuals with diabetes must be mindful of how much carbohydrates they eat, they don’t need to avoid it altogether. Carbohydrates are the body’s main source of fuel and are necessary to maintain proper cellular function. The type of carbohydrates and portion size are what matter most.

There are three types of carbohydrates: starches, sugars and fiber. Starches are found naturally in foods such as bread, cereal, rice, crackers, pasta, potatoes, peas, corn and beans. Sugars are found naturally in foods including fruits and milk and are also concentrated in processed foods such as candy, cake and soda. Fiber is the roughage in plant foods and helps keep the digestive tract healthy. Soluble fiber, found in foods including oatmeal and fruit, can help maintain a healthy cholesterol level.

Individuals with diabetes should choose most of their carbohydrates from nutrient-rich whole foods such as fruits and vegetables, beans, whole grains and dairy products. Sweets and sugary beverages should be saved for special occasions. And, spreading carbohydrates evenly throughout the day helps prevents spikes and dips in blood sugar. A registered dietitian nutritionist can create a specific meal plan that harmonizes individual preferences with the special needs of someone with diabetes.

To get a general idea of how much carbohydrates to eat, consider someone on a 2,000-calorie meal plan. For 2,000 calories, an RDN may recommend that one meal contain about 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates. Carbohydrate intake at meals depends upon how many meals and snacks a person plans to eat throughout the day. A serving of carbohydrates is 15 grams. Here are examples of one-serving portions of some carbohydrate-containing foods to include in meals and snacks.

  • 1 small piece of fresh fruit (4 ounces)
  • ½ cup of canned or frozen fruit
  • 1 slice of bread (1 ounce) or 1 (6-inch) tortilla
  • ½ cup of oatmeal (cooked)
  • ⅓ cup of pasta or rice (cooked)
  • 4 to 6 crackers
  • ½ English muffin or hamburger bun
  • ½ cup of black beans or starchy vegetable
  • ¼ of a large baked potato (3 ounces)
  • ⅔ cup of plain fat-free yogurt or sweetened with an artificial sweetener
  • 2 small cookies
  • 2-inch square brownie or cake without frosting
  • ½ cup ice cream
  • ¼ cup of sherbet
  • 1 tablespoon syrup, jam, jelly, sugar or honey
  • 2 tablespoons light syrup

Keeping blood sugar and diabetes controlled depends heavily on the right diet. The Fresh ‘n Fit Cuisine meal plan gives you an easy way to be sure you’re receiving nutritionally-balanced, calorie-controlled meals. We encourage you to ask your physician about which one of our calorie plans to choose. Some diabetics can look forward to reducing their insulin while many can eliminate oral medication completely. Try one of our 5 chef prepared, gourmet menus, which includes a low carb option, and save 10% on your first order with promo code BLOG10.

Healthy Snacking with Diabetes

When managing your diabetes with diet and exercise, it can be difficult to know which snacks won’t spike your blood pressure or give you adverse snacking side effects. Today we’ve found a healthy snacking guide from nutrition411.org. Whether you have diabetes or you just want to snack healthy, this article is a great resource!

Remember that Fresh ‘n Fit Cuisine’s healthy mix and low carb menus are great for managing diabetes. With a low glycemic index, low sodium, and low sugar levels, our meals provide balanced nutrition, convenient eating, and delicious flavors. Sign up for our blog and receive 10% OFF your first order with promo code BLOG 10!

Snacking can contribute to a healthy diet, ensuring that your body gets the fuel it needs every 3–5 hours to control your blood sugar and appetite, and keep you energized.

A snack, as opposed to a treat, is a “mini-meal” meant to provide nutrients required by the body. Snacks that contain a combination of carbohydrates with fiber and protein, while low in fat, salt, and sugar, are better at controlling blood sugar and appetite. Try these ideas for healthy snacks.

Average 15 grams (g) total carbohydrate*

  • One whole Thomas® Light Multi-Grain English Muffin with 1 tablespoon (Tbsp) nut butter
  • 2 Tbsp raisins and ¼ cup (C) almonds
  • Hard-cooked egg and one slice of whole-wheat toast with ½ teaspoon (tsp) margarine
  • One half banana or one medium apple with 1 Tbsp peanut butter
  • ½ C low-fat cottage cheese and ½ C lite peaches
  • 4 ounce (oz) Kozy Shack® No Sugar Added Rice Pudding and ¼ C nuts
  • Kabobs made with 1 C melon and 1 oz low-fat cheese
  • Celery and dip made from 1 Tbsp peanut butter and 2 Tbsp raisins
  • ½ C sugar snap peas and 2 Tbsp hummus (bean dip)
  • Five Reduced Fat Triscuits® with 1 oz low-fat cheese
  • ½ C lite tuna or egg salad in one half of a whole-wheat pita
  • One whole Thomas Light Multi-Grain English Muffin topped with tomato sauce and 1 oz low-fat mozzarella cheese, and then baked
  • 10 Multi-Grain Wheat Thins® with 1 oz low-fat string cheese and 4 fluid ounces (fl oz) of tomato juice
  • One small baked potato topped with salsa and 1 oz low-fat cheese
  • 1 oz lean ham rolled in one whole-grain pancake

Average 30 g total carbohydrate*

  • Trail mix (example: 1 C Kashi® Heart to Heart® Cereal, 2 Tbsp dried cranberries, ¼ C almonds)
  • Whole-wheat tortilla filled with ½ C low-fat refried beans, 1 oz low-fat cheddar cheese, and salsa, and heated in microwave
  • One half banana and 1 Tbsp peanut butter placed and rolled in whole-wheat tortilla
  • ½ C whole-grain cereal with ½ C skim milk
  • 1 C sugar-free, fat-free yogurt, topped with ¼ C Fiber One® or Grape-Nuts
  • One Eggo® Nutri-Grain® Waffle, dipped  in ½ C Mott’s® Healthy Harvest Sauce (applesauce)
  • ½ C fruit blended with 1 C low-fat, sugar-free yogurt and 2 Tbsp flaxseed meal
  • Nachos made with eight Baked Snyder’s® of Hanover MultiGrain Tortilla Chips, 1 oz cheese, and salsa
  • ½ C Pepperidge Farm® Goldfish® Baked Snack Crackers Made With Whole Grain and a medium apple
  • Whole-wheat tortilla, topped with ½ C apples and low-fat cheddar, and then heated in microwave
  • 9 oz angel food cake or reduced-fat biscuit with 1 C strawberries
  • One small baked sweet potato, topped with ½ C pineapple tidbits
  • One small baked potato, topped with ½ C bean chili
  • 3 C low-fat popcorn with 2 Tbsp nuts and 1 C sugar-free hot cocoa

The Diabetic Diet: Common Myths

So you’ve been diagnosed as pre-diabetic or with type 2 diabetes and your doctor has suggested you manage your condition with diet and exercise. This news can be overwhelming and trying to navigate through all the information can make it even worse. Thankfully, we’ve identified two great resources for you today. First from Ms. Charlotte Hayes, a Certified Diabetes Educator and Registered Dietitian, as well as some helpful information from nutrition411.org. Remember that Fresh ‘n Fit Cuisine’s healthy mix and low carb menus are great for managing diabetes. With a low glycemic index, low sodium, and low sugar levels, our meals provide balanced nutrition, convenient eating, and delicious flavors. Sign up for our blog and receive 10% OFF your first order with promo code BLOG 10!

Need to exercise but scared to start? In her book titled, The “I Hate to Exercise”, Charlotte Hayes, MMSc, MS, RD, CDE gives you ways to turn every day home activities into a low impact fitness plan you’ll love. Buy the book HERE and get started on your path to wellness!

hCG meals: Creole Tilapia, Garlic Chicken, Rosemary Cod, and Herb Beef Medallions

hCG meals: Creole Tilapia, Garlic Chicken, Rosemary Cod, and Herb Beef Medallions

Common Myths of Diabetes Diets from nutrition411.org

Myth: Carbohydrates are “bad. Avoid them.
Fact: Carbohydrates are an integral part of any diet, including the diet for diabetes. Carbohydrate-rich foods provide energy (calories), vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytonutrients. You are asked to monitor your carbohydrate intake because carbohydrate has more of an impact on blood glucose levels than either fat or protein. Carbohydrates are found in starches, fruits, vegetables, and milk, making it very difficult to eliminate them from the diet. Some carbohydrates are better than others. Whole grains are always a better choice than refined carbohydrates, but you can incorporate all carbohydrates into a healthful meal plan.

Myth: You can never, ever eat another cookie.
Fact: All foods are “allowed” on the carbohydrate counting plan. You can work any food into the plan, in moderation. Of course, many foods are better choices than cookies on a daily basis, but you still can eat an occasional cookie.

Myth: You will need to prepare “special meals” for yourself.
Fact: You can eat with your friends and family. You may need to monitor your portion size or make wise choices when a varied selection of food is available, but you can eat the same meals as anyone else, as long as you have planned for it. You can dine in restaurants, eat at home with your family, or attend parties/events with buffets. Once you have dedicated yourself to the idea of integrating your diet into your current lifestyle, you can choose from many options of where and what to eat.

Myth: You need to buy “sugar-free” foods.
Fact: “Sugar free” does not mean “carbohydrate free.” Many sugar-free foods contain as many, or more, carbohydrates as “regular” versions. Your best bet is to carefully scrutinize all food labels. Remember that 15 grams (g) of carbohydrates equals 1 carbohydrate choice. It does not matter, for the sake of carbohydrate counting, what form those 15 g of carbohydrate come in—natural sugar, added sugar, grain, etc.

Myth: As long as you count carbohydrates, you can eat as much protein and fat as you want.
Fact: Unfortunately, people with diabetes have a much higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This is why it is so important not to focus exclusively on carbohydrate intake. The amount and type of fat that you consume is also very important to your health.

Type 2 Diabetes and Exercise

In honor of American Diabetes Month, we’re continuing to share information about diabetes, prevention, and treatment options. Today, we’re talking about Type 2 Diabetes and how you can manage it with exercise! Exercise is a very important part of diabetes management to help control your blood sugar and weight! If you’re managing diabetes, Fresh ‘n Fit Cuisine’s chef prepared, gourmet meals are a great way to get delicious, sugar controlled, low glycemic meals that are ready to eat! No cooking or clean up! Save 10% on your first order with promo code BLOG10! http://www.freshnfitcuisine.com

Continue reading this Q & A from Nutrition411.org for more information!

hCG fish, hCG steak, veggie chili, lasagna rolls.

Can I exercise if my blood sugar is not under control?
Probably, but check with your doctor. The American Diabetes Association® says that you probably should avoid vigorous physical activity if ketosis is present (elevated ketones in the urine). However, previous recommendations to avoid exercise if blood sugars are >300 milligrams/deciliter are probably more cautious than needed for a person with type 2 diabetes, especially after a meal. Provided you feel well and drink enough water, your blood sugar alone is not a reason to avoid exercise.

If I take insulin, what precautions do I need to take with my exercise routine?
When you take insulin, physical activity can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if your medication dose or carbohydrate intake is not changed. You should closely monitor your blood sugar level before and after exercise, and adjust your insulin, as needed, to maintain normal blood sugar. Your doctor may recommend a snack such as a Glucerna® bar or other foods with a mix of protein and carbohydrate before or after exercise. Make sure to talk to a registered dietitian or registered dietitian nutritionist about how you can fit exercise into your eating pattern.

What are the benefits of exercise?
Exercise has many benefits for everyone, including improved cardiovascular health and increased strength, flexibility, and endurance. Many people find that regular exercise helps reduce stress and provides a feeling of well-being. Exercise also helps speed weight loss, and exercise helps you maintain your weight if you have lost weight.

A recent study of those with type 2 diabetes showed that structured exercise programs had a beneficial effect on blood sugar control. This study also found that individuals with type 2 diabetes who already are exercising should increase the intensity of their exercise to get even more blood sugar control.

Do I need to check with my doctor before I begin exercising?
Absolutely. Your doctor knows your health history and what medicines you are taking. Even if your blood glucose levels usually are normal, the medications you take for other conditions can affect your health and ability to exercise. In some cases, your doctor may recommend a stress test before you start exercising, especially if you plan vigorous exercise, such as aerobics classes, running, or bicycling.

How much aerobic exercise should I do every day if I have diabetes?
Aerobic exercise is the type of exercise that gets your heart pumping enough so that you are mildly out of breath while performing the exercise. Examples of aerobic exercise include brisk walking, running, bicycling, water aerobics, swimming laps for exercise, and aerobic exercise classes.

To improve your blood sugar control, assist with weight maintenance, and reduce your risk of heart disease, you should plan for at least 150 minutes/week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and/or at least 90 minutes/week of vigorous physical activity. To get the most benefit, exercise at least 3 days every week and try not to go more than 2 days in a row without exercise. For long-term maintenance of major weight loss, more exercise sometimes is needed.

Individuals with type 2 diabetes who are exercising already may need to increase the intensity of their exercise to obtain more benefits.

Should I also lift weights?
Unless your doctor recommends against it, resistance exercise (weight lifting) three times a week targeting all major muscle groups is a good idea. Use weights heavy enough so that after three sets of 8 to 10 repetitions they are difficult to lift.

How do I know if exercise is causing low blood sugar?
Check your blood glucose levels before, immediately after, and several hours after exercise to make sure you are picking up any blood sugar changes resulting from exercise. If you tend to have low blood sugar during or after exercise, you can reduce medications or consume extra carbohydrates.

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